Cutting Wood

Cutting Wood

The most essential thing about BBQ is cooking with wood. Without it you are just roasting in an oven and it isn't the same thing.   

Traditionally the wood used for BBQ should be what is most abundant on your region, lends good flavor to the meat and doesn't poison you.  The last point being very important!

Where I grew up in Central Texas,  the majority of the BBQ is cooked with Post Oak. People can get pretty snobbish about what type of wood to use, especially in Texas, where many claim that Post Oak  is the best hands down due to its mild flavor.   But people also use Hickory and Mesquite.  I even read about a BBQ joint in NYC (of course NYC!), that had cords of post oak delivered by train to their restaurant.  How ridiculous is that!!! There is nothing magical about Post Oak, it just happens to be cheap and plentiful in the central Texas area and always has been.  

Luckily when I moved to Maui in 2004, I noticed right away a tree that dotted the leeward side of the island looked very similar to Mesquite, right down to the thorns and beans. Turns out that Mesquite and Kiawe  are genetically kissing cousins. Kiawe is an introduced species to Hawaii that thrives in low water conditions and sandy soil.  In its native land of Peru it is also used as a cooking and heating fuel.  If you've ever had one of its thorns shoot into your foot on the way to the beach you probably hate it, but I've developed a soft spot for it.  It's extremely resilient, and can grow up be 100 plus years old. When they are larger and well maintained they also make very nice shade trees.  That being said, they are invasive to Hawaii and are usually treated as scrub. Well luckily we've found a good use for it. 

Due to its abundant nature on Maui at my current output  level, when they clear a lot here or trim around power lines I can go out and chainsaw logs and split the wood for free.  How affordable is that?  

Cooking with wood that is too green won't work as the logs have too much moisture in it. That makes it both difficult to light and also hard to split when it's fresh cut. Ideally I like my wood to be dried in the Kihei sun for about 6 months, or for as long as a year,  but it can be ready in as little as 3 months if its hot, sunny and dry outside.

 

In the end it's a lot of work but I do enjoy it, as I feel like I put my hands into the entire process of cooking.  I think it's an extra step that makes what I do better, and that's something to be proud of. In the end good Brisket is nothing more than being seasoned with salt and pepper and them slowly cooked at a low and steady temperature.  It's starts with the wood and ends with dinner. Enjoy next time you eat with me! 

This is one of my favorite Kiawe trees that I pass every day. I love the way it has one long branch that is like an arm.  

This is one of my favorite Kiawe trees that I pass every day. I love the way it has one long branch that is like an arm.  

The wood  

Tools of the trade. A chainsaw, a maul and a splitting axe.   

Tools of the trade. A chainsaw, a maul and a splitting axe.   

The payoff  

After 12-14 hours of cooking you get to take your picture with a brisket 😀 

image.jpg
image.jpg

Taco

Taco

While down exploring the Baja Peninsula, just a long chip shot from our beautiful island home of Maui, I found some incredible roadside tortillas. Made fresh daily by the masaria and fried up fresh to order. Time to head back to the kitchen and keep refining my techinque! 

Making Tarte Tatin

Making Tarte Tatin

A fun little video showing me making a Tarte Tatin for an anniversary dinner in Kapalua.

The drive from Kihei along past Maalaea Harbor and around the Pali always makes me love living in Maui all over again. Yesterday, the skies were blue, the whales were jumping and I was on my way to make a family's evening better with a romantic catered dinner during the Maui sunset. 

Bacon, its what's for every meal

Bacon, its what's for every meal

Have I ever told you that I made really killer bacon? I do. I try to maintain humility in all other facets, but there is no way around this one: My. Bacon. Rocks. 

It certainly helps that I love to make it: first I cut the shoulder into the perfect slab. Large, rectangular, solid. Then I marinade it, and this is where the fun is. Should I make coriander, brown sugar, sage? or maybe bay leaf, garlic, brown sugar, coriander, dark rum? Black pepper, brown sugar crusted? So many options, so much delicious bacon to make. After marinading, it gets smoked in my Texas offset smoker over Maui Kiawe hardwood. Then in to cure for several days. 

Follow my Instagram or Facebook accounts @SmokeandspiceMaui to hear when I am making up my next batch. You will be glad you did. 

Making Porchetta

Making Porchetta

I made Porchetta for the second time last night during a private chef tasting dinner. I loved how mine turned out last time, but knew I wanted the skin to be completely crisped and the inside to be fork tender. I also planted a new crop of basil in my organic herb garden, which had bloomed well in the past couple of weeks. Growing things easily is such a side benefit to living on Maui and cooking on Maui. To me, garden fresh herbs always remind me of working in the soil alongside my mother when I was younger. The smell of the fresh soil coupled with the pungent aroma of the herbs whose leaves might have been bent or broken in the process really takes me back. I digress. After smoking the bound porchetta on my Texas offset smoker, I let it rest and placed it in the sous vide to hold it at temperature until I oven-finished it. The result was a crackling hot pork skin with a strong herb marinade flavor inside that complimented but didn't overwhelm the flavor of the meat. Bon Appetit!

Why we buy local

Why we buy local

We are fortunate to call Maui our home, and the farmers and fisherman of Hawaii our neighbors. Buying directly from the source here at home not only ensures the peak of freshness and taste, but supports our local community. 

808-283-6586